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There’s certainly lots to do in the fruit garden at this time of year, starting with these top grow your own fruits for June.

Fruit garden care

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In the garden, weeding is the top priority, along with protecting ripening fruit from birds who will be showing a very keen interest.

Raspberries are shallow rooted and so keeping weeds at bay is especially important; just be careful to weed gently so as not to damage the roots.

It’s also a good idea to start giving your plants a weekly feed with diluted seaweed liquid which acts as a tonic and helps keep them healthy and hopefully less susceptible to diseases and disorders.

Vitis vinifera (grape vine)

Stems and leaves should now be growing rapidly. Tie in new growth carefully, as young shoots are fragile. Remove excess leaves and cut back the stems to leave approximately 5 leaves beyond where you see flowers. A vine expert once described the process as removing enough leaves to create a partially see-through screen.

  • Harvest from August to November
  • Hardy
  • Can grow higher than 12 metres
  • Well-drained soil
  • Full sun
  • Sheltered
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Malus (apples)

At this time of the year, apple trees naturally shed excess fruit so don’t be alarmed if you see young apples falling to the ground. This is known as the ‘June drop’ and usually occurs at this time of the year when the tree sheds surplus fruit. It can also occur if the weather has been bad after flowering and/or there has been poor pollination of the fruit.

Malus ‘Red Love’

  • Harvest from August to November
  • Hardy
  • Grows up to 2m tall
  • Moist but well-drained soil
  • Full sun or partial shade
  • Sheltered or exposed
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Fragaria × ananassa (strawberries)

June is traditionally the month when many varieties of strawberries are producing delicious ripe fruit. The plants also start to produce runners (baby new plants), so keep a look out for these. Peg down the baby plants into the ground to encourage roots to form, giving new rooted plants later in the season. Alternatively, you can cut off the runners when they appear if you don’t want new plants and this will encourage the plant to produce more fruit.

Strawberry ‘Albion’

  • Harvest from June to September
  • Fully hardy
  • Grows up to 30cm tall
  • Moist but well-drained or well-drained soil
  • Full sun
  • Sheltered or exposed
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Ribes uva-crispa (gooseberries)

This month, gooseberry plants bear lots of tiny fruit, and now is a great time to thin them out to allow remaining berries to grow larger. You can use the thinnings to create a tasty fruit pie or jam. The rest of the fruits will be ready to pick from July to August.

Gooseberry ‘Invicta’

  • Harvest from June to August
  • Fully hardy
  • Grows up to 1.5m tall
  • Well-drained soil
  • Full sun or partial shade
  • Sheltered or exposed
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Rubus fruticosus (thornless blackberries)

Keep an eye out as stems will suddenly put on growth spurts and will need tying-in. This also applies to other cane fruit like raspberries, tay, and loganberries. From mid-summer, the berries will begin to ripen, ready for harvesting when they’re plump and rich in colour.

Blackberry ‘Merton Thornless’

  • Harvest from July to September
  • Fully hardy
  • Grows up to 2m tall
  • Moist but well-drained or well-drained soil
  • Full sun or partial shade
  • Sheltered or exposed
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So, grow your own fruit this June and ensure your fruit garden is flourishing with the right care for a great harvest.

Spring is here, see my post on spring pollinators:

Or check out my Pinterest board for more ideas:

spring pollinators
Spring pollinators
Pinterest
Pinterest Board


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