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Salvias are a diverse group of plants ranging from herbs and annuals to herbaceous and evergreen perennials. They bring fragrance to your garden as well as colour in shades of cream, red, pink, purple, and blue. Find out more about growing salvias…

Many varieties are free-flowering, making them great for colourful border displays throughout the summer. The flowers are immensely popular with wildlife, so they are great plants for attracting bees and butterflies.

Growing salvias

Rose-petal-salad-2

Salvia are sun-loving plants, so ensure they are planted in full sun in a sheltered spot. They need well-drained soil that is moderately fertile. In long, dry spells the plants will need watering to ensure they get the necessary moisture.

In addition, they grow well in containers, making them a good addition to many different garden styles, from balcony gardens to courtyard spaces.

This also makes it easy to move certain types into the conservatory through winter where they will continue to flower.

When the flowers begin to fade, they can be deadheaded and plant shoots that spoil the symmetry can be trimmed in spring.

There are some salvias that are more tender, and these will need to be move indoors in autumn. Alternatively, take cuttings in summer so you don’t get any winter losses.

Types to try

Salvia officinalis (common sage)

Of course, first up is common sage that is a popular addition in the kitchen. It’s a shrubby evergreen that has a recognisable scent and blue flowers in summer. A lovely addition to any herb garden, they’re also well suited to be grown among other plants in a Mediterranean style garden.

  • Evergreen foliage and flowers in summer
  • Hardy
  • Grows up to 1m tall
  • Moist but well-drained soil
  • Full sun or partial shade
  • Sheltered
Lavender-sprigs-in-lemon-drink

Salvia guaranitica (anise-scented sage) ‘Black and Blue’

This tall perennial is a perfect addition to attract pollinators with the dark blue flowers that bloom in summer and autumn. In a sunny, sheltered spot this salvia will look great in a variety of garden styles including coastal gardens.

  • Flowers in summer
  • Hardy in coastal and relatively mild parts of the UK
  • Grows up to 2.5m tall
  • Well-drained soil
  • Full sun
  • Sheltered
Lavender-sprigs-in-lemon-drink

Salvia (sage) ‘Amistad’

The upright, aromatic foliage of this sage is joined by deep purple tubular flowers from early summer up until the first frosts. They are drought resistant when established, making them a great choice for gravel gardens.

  • Flowers in summer
  • Hardy in coastal and relatively mild parts of the UK
  • Grows up to 1.5m tall
  • Moist but well-drained or well-drained soil
  • Full sun
  • Sheltered
Lavender-sprigs-in-lemon-drink

Salvia nemorosa (Balkan clary) ‘Ostfriesland’

Next is a compact, bushy sage with dense racemes of purple-blue flowers in summer and autumn. Again, a perfect plant for pollinators, this is a great addition to a wildlife garden.

  • Flowers in summer
  • Fully hardy
  • Grows up to 50cm tall
  • Moist but well-drained
  • Full sun
  • Exposed or sheltered
Lavender-sprigs-in-lemon-drink

Salvia (sage) ‘Hot Lips’

This is a firm favourite of mine, with red and white flowers that bloom in summer, joining the aromatic green foliage. This evergreen will add structure to many garden styles in the beds and borders as well as containers.

  • Evergreen foliage and flowers in summer
  • Hardy
  • Grows up to 1m tall
  • Moist but well-drained or well-drained soil
  • Full sun
  • Sheltered
Lavender-sprigs-in-lemon-drink

With a wide variety of salvias to choose from, there’s bound to be one to suit your garden style. Growing well in containers and in the ground, pick a sunny but sheltered spot and your salvias will thrive.

Spring is here, see my post on spring pollinators:

Or check out my Pinterest board for more ideas:

spring pollinators
Spring pollinators
Pinterest
Pinterest Board


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