Share the story
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 2
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

September is a lovely time for fruit in the garden. Many different types of fruit start to ripen now. Also, it’s a good time to plant new fruit trees and shrubs because the soil is still relatively warm. Get out the books on preserving and pickling or have a go at making your own fruit infused gin or vodka. Either way, there is plenty to keep you occupied both outside and inside, in the kitchen!

Rhubarb

If you haven’t already done so, top dress established clumps of rhubarb with well-rotted organic matter such as horse manure or garden compost. However, ensure the soil is moist before doing so.

‘Timperley Early’

  • Harvest from February to May
  • Hardy
  • Grows up to 60cm tall
  • Moist but well-drained soil
  • Full sun or partial shade
  • Exposed or sheltered
Rose-petal-salad-2

Raspberries

Autumn fruiting varieties should be picked regularly to prevent overripe fruit rotting and potentially spreading disease. Newly purchased raspberry canes are best planted in early autumn whilst the soil is still warm. Start preparing the soil by removing weeds and digging in well-rotted organic matter such as garden compost or horse manure.

‘Autumn Bliss’

  • Harvest from August to October
  • Hardy
  • Grows up to 1.5m tall
  • Moist but well-drained soil.
  • Full sun
  • Exposed or sheltered
Rose-petal-salad-2

Grapes

When growing white grapes, remove enough foliage from around the ripening bunches to maximise light reaching them. Look for grapes taking on a transparent appearance, as this is a sign of approaching ripeness. On the other hand, black grapes need to be surrounded by leaves to improve berry colour. If growing grapes in a greenhouse increase daytime ventilation and leave some windows open at night to reduce humidity.

‘Phoenix’

  • Harvest from September to October
  • Hardy
  • Grows up to 1.8m tall
  • Moist but well-drained soil
  • Full sun
  • Exposed or sheltered
Rose-petal-salad-2

Cherries

Autumn is a great time of the year to plant cherry trees. Sour cherries are easier to cultivate than sweet ones. Not only do they tolerate heavier soil, shade and cold better, but they are also self-fertile, so you will only need one tree to obtain fruit.

‘Morello’

  • Harvest in July
  • Hardy
  • Grows up to 4m tall
  • Moist but well-drained soil
  • Full sun
  • Sheltered
Rose-petal-salad-2

Apples

Several different varieties will be ripening and ready to harvest this month. To test if they are ready to harvest, lift the apple in the palm of your hand and give it a slight twist. If it comes away easily, it’s ready, if not it needs longer on the tree. However, cooking apples can be used before they are fully ripe. If you want to store dessert apples over winter, it’s best to pick and store them before they’re ripe, otherwise they quickly deteriorate.

‘Gala’

  • Harvest in September
  • Hardy
  • Grows up to 1m tall
  • Moist but well-drained soil
  • Full sun
  • Sheltered or exposed
Rose-petal-salad-2

Harvesting fruit and using it in the kitchen to enhance the taste of your meals is a joy. September is a fantastic month for fruit in the garden, with plenty to harvest. I’d love to know what fruit you’re growing this September.

Find out more about adding texture to your garden:

Or check out my Pinterest board for more ideas:

Adding texture
Adding texture
Pinterest
Pinterest Board

Share the story
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 2
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •