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We had barrowloads of entries for our fab Cultivation Street contest and really dig what you have done! Now let’s hear it for our overall winner…

HANDS aloft, they have every reason to celebrate after building a fantastic community garden through years of aspiration, inspiration and no small amount of perspiration. These fine volunteers at Herts & Essex Community Farm in Harlow, Essex, are the overall winner of the Cultivation Street 2019 contest. Volunteers nationwide have worked their socks off at community projects. We had hundreds of amazing entries and, thanks to sponsor Calliope® Geraniums, supported by the Sunday Mirror, we’ve given away nearly £20,000 in prizes across all categories. Judges, including myself, Mark Glover – chief executive of Newington Communications – ITV regional presenter Lauren Hall and the Sunday Mirror’s deputy editor, Gemma Aldridge, had our work cut out. Lauren said:

“The highlight was seeing so many inspiring gardens which make such a difference to their communities. They are beautiful outdoor spaces which have the potential to transform people’s lives. We saw gardens being used to help educate children, as well as those which can boost physical and mental wellbeing.

Flowers-decorating-cake
Flowers-decorating-cake
Flowers-decorating-cake

Read the full article here

Tip:

Adding bulbs to your patio pots

this autumn will really give them the wow factor 

in spring when everything is otherwise

grey and gloomy.

Reader questions

My pond plants are really fading. Should I give them a boost during autumn?

red-hot-poker

Your pond’s marginal plants can grow to cover half the water surface without affecting pond life. Reducing amounts of water-cleaning plants might affect resident wildlife, so it’s a good idea to divide pond plants, even waterlilies, to increase stocks.

I’ve noticed fungi growing near a few of my plants. Should I be worried?

red-hot-poker

Saprophytic fungi may appear towards the end of September, causing white fungal growth, mushrooms or toadstools. These aren’t harmful to plants. But honey fungus, which grows in dense honey-coloured clumps, can attack roots of woody and perennial plants. Remove affected woody growth along with infected root systems.

Check out my blog on community garden winners here:

Or check out my Pinterest board for more ideas:

grow-your-own-garnish
Better health winners
Pinterest flower power
Pinterest Board


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